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Rental of the Manors of Earls Colne and Colne Priory (ERO D/DPr118)

1854 (1854)

document 80000260

Copyhold of Earldom - quitrent 1s4d James Phil Honywood Sam Forster 5.4.1832 admitted as trustees under the will of Wm Phil Honywood To all those several parcels of meadow ground called Parks Gate also Ringers containing by estimation 10a, parcel of a farm called Newhouse etc.

Death fine assessed with other copyholds

1749 Henrietta Letch as daughter and devisee of Jn Morley

1752 Henrietta Letch afterwards wife of Peter Bernard Scale on death of her mother

1798 Jacob Pattison surrender of Peter B. and Henrietta Scale

1811 Jos Pattison

1811 Wm Honywood

1820 Wm Phil Honywood

Terrier 1598 Fo. 62

Abstract title p. 15 and 16

No 558 (558) 1a3p First Ringers Mead

607 (607) - 3a1r14p Middle Ringers

608 (608) Further Ringers 3a2r9p together 7a3r26p - Commutation map which see

This is a long strip of meadow extending from the Hayhouse Meadow, under Colne Park, to the junction of the parishes of Earls Colne and Halstead. When mr Honywood was admitted in 1820 his steward objected to the fine as levied on an excess of quantity - and on investigation it was discovered that mr Honywood had only purchased that parcel of these meadows extending from the road near Nightingale Hall, over the brook, to Halstead parish - and that the other part of this meadow must have been sold to mr Oliver Johnson (uncle of the late Oliver ) in 1778 by Allington Morley with New House Farm - extending north-east from the abovementioned road, to the Hayhouse, otherwise Brook, Meadow. It does not appear that mr Johnson was admitted to this parcel of Ringers and the quantity of 10a appears in mr Honywood's admission and that he pays the entire quitrent of 1s4d. From mr Honywood's recent purchase of Hayhouse property 1852 the whole is now in his possession. The map etc. of this long slip of meadow will be found in the Terrier 1598 Fo. 62. (Meadow land in an early period of agriculture must have been valuable. There is a curious entry in the handwriting of mr Harlakenden on the admission of sir Jn Jacob in 1639 - " the land is 10a of river meadow worth 19li or 20li per annum and he paid for his fine and promised me half a buck at any time 29li ")